Skip to content Skip to navigation

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellowship

The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellowship is offered in conjunction with the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies to use the Boston Athenæum’s holdings relevant to the 18th century and comes with a stipend of $1,500 for a residency of twenty days (four weeks) and includes a year’s membership to the Boston Athenæum. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals holding the appropriate U.S. government documents.

This fellowship requires membership in the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.
 

Applicants should use this online formto be considered for the Athenæum's American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellowship. Applications are due April 15, and all applicants will be notified by early June.

Past Recipients of an ASECS Fellowship

2014-2015

James Alexander Dun, Assistant Professor, Princeton University, "Dangerous Neighbors: Philadelphia and the Making of the Haitian Revolution in the Early American Republic"

2013-2014

Jason Farr, Ph.D. Candidate, University of California, San Diego, "Queer Deformities: Disability and Sexuality in Eighteenth-Century Women's Fiction--Haywood, Scott, Burney"

2012-2013

Josh Reid, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts, Boston, “Indigenous Explorers in the Pacific”

2011-2012

Susan Wager, Ph.D. candidate, Columbia University, “Madame de Pompadour's Indiscreet Jewels: Reproduction, Luxury Consumption, and the Construction of Self in Eighteenth-Century France”

2010-2011

Laura Adderley, professor, Tulane University, “The Routine ‘Horrors’ of Slave Ship Rape: Interpreting Sexual Violence in the Atlantic Slave Trade”

2009-2010

Brooke Barbier, instructor, Stonehill College, “Daughters of Liberty: Young Women’s Culture in Early National Boston”

2008-2009

Andrew M. Wehrman, Ph.D. candidate at Northwestern University, for his dissertation research “Sore Spots: Disease, Empire and Revolution in Salem and Marblehead, Massachusetts”

2007-2008

Jeremy Gregory, professor, University of Manchester (England) for his book project, “Refashioning Puritan New England:  The Church of England and Religious Identity in Colonial North America, ca. 1680-ca. 1780”

2006-2007

Thomas E. Conroy, professor, Stonehill College, "Patronage, Party, and Plaster: The Building of Federal Boston"

2005-2006

Caroline Breashears, professor, St. Lawrence University, project on memoirs of unconventional women in the long eighteenth century, 1660-1830

2004-2005

Chernoh M. Sesay, Jr., Ph.D. candidate, Northwestern University, “’all things are changeable’:  The World of Prince and Hall and the Development of Black Atlantic Identities, 1760-1820”

2003-2004

Martha Elena Rojas (Sweet Briar College) for revising for publication her Stanford dissertation “Diplomatic Letters:  The Conduct and Culture of U.S. Foreign Affairs in the Early Republic”