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SOLD OUT: Boston: Sink or Swim

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm
Reception to follow

This event is SOLD OUT. Watch it LIVE on September 21st!

You are welcome to register on our waitlist
 
Alan Berger, Kerry Emanuel, Markus Buehler, and moderator Cynthia Barnhart
 

Boston: Sink or Swim

Please join us for a panel discussion featuring Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty as they address the impact of climate change in Boston and the surrounding areas.

The Boston Athenæum has long been a venue for intellectual discourse on leading issues of the day. Once considered purely a scientific subject, global climate change is now recognized as an issue with consequences for a variety of disciplines including law, government and public policy, economics, human rights, and culture. A survey of visual materials of the local natural and built environments in the Athenæum’s special collection shows the dramatic impacts humans have had on the landscape and environment, particularly over the last 200 years. Global climate change will certainly require further changes to our built environment. Please join us for a panel discussion featuring Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty as they address the impact of climate change in Boston and the surrounding areas.

Alan Berger is Professor of Landscape Architecture and Urban Design at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning where he teaches courses open to the entire student body. He is Co-Director of CAU, MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism, and founding director of P-REX lab at MIT. All of his research and work emphasizes the link between urbanization and consumption of natural resources, and the waste and destruction of landscape, to help us better understand how to proceed with redesigning around our wasteful lifestyles for more intelligent outcomes.

Kerry Emanuel, Cecil & Ida Green Professor of Atmospheric Science, has been a member of the faculty of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) since 1981. He has served as Director of the Center for Meteorology and Physical Oceanography in EAPS and in 2011, he co-founded the Lorenz Center at for climate research. He is interested in fundamental properties of moist convection, including the scaling of convective velocities and the nature of the diurnal cycle of convection over land.

Cynthia Barnhart, is the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Chancellor, and Ford Foundation Professor of Engineering, with an appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. At MIT, she has served as acting and associate dean of the School of Engineering; co-director of the Operations Research Center; co-director of the Center for Transportation and Logistics; and founding director of the Transportation@MIT initiative.

Markus Buehler is a Professor and Head of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Buehler pursues research in advanced materials that offer greater resilience and a wide range of controllable properties from the nano to the macroscale. His most recent book, Biomateriomics,presents a new paradigm for the analysis of bio-inspired materials and structures to devise sustainable technologies. Buehler has received numerous awards and recognition, including the Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award, the highest honor bestowed on young MIT faculty. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Registration for this free event will begin on September 4 at 9:00 a.m.
 

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