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The King Under the Car Park: The Search for Richard III

Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm
Registration is NOT required
National Portrait Gallery, London.
National Portrait Gallery, London.

The King Under the Car Park: The Search for Richard III

Richard Buckley

For centuries, the final resting place of Richard III, England’s last Plantagenet king, remained a mystery. In 2012, a team of archaeologists from the University of Leicester set out to search for the burial site of the king, who died in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. Against all odds, the project located the site under a parking lot in central Leicester. In this lecture, Richard Buckley, the leader of the search team, will tell the remarkable story of the search and the complex process of confirming Richard’s identity.

Richard Buckley has spent over 35 years working as an archeologist in Leicester, specializing in complex Roman and medieval urban sites and historic buildings. He is co-Director of University of Leicester Archaeological Services. Most recently, he was consultant and project manager for the Highcross Leicester project, involving excavation of the three largest archeological sites in the City so far. His publications include Leicester Town Defences, Leicester Castle Hall, Leicester Abbey, Visions of Ancient Leicester,and Richard III: The King Under the Car Park.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Boston Branch of the English-Speaking Union of the United States.Richard Buckley

Richard III died before the Protestant Reformation swept through Europe. His original tomb is thought to have been destroyed during the Reformation. Learn more about the Reformation in England by examining period documents such as Nicholas Ridley’s 1566A pituous lamentation of the miserable estate of the churche of Christ in England, in the time of queene Mary orThomas James’s 1612 A treatise on the corrvption of Scripture, councels, and fathers, by prelats, pastors, and pillars of the church of Rome, for maintenance of popery and irreligion.