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The Vicissitudes of Pluralism

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Reception to follow
Members only with no fee
Credit NASA
Credit NASA.

The Vicissitudes of Pluralism

Peter L. Berger

In his recent book, The Many Altars of Modernity: Toward a Paradigm for Religion in a Pluralist Age, Peter Berger argues that, contrary to popular belief, we don’t live in a secular age–we live in a pluralist one. Put differently, our problem is not that God is dead, but that there are many gods. Join us for a consideration of a new paradigm for understanding religion and pluralism in an age of multiple modernities.

Peter L. Berger, PhD, is a Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, at Boston University and the founder of the Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs. He received his PhD in Sociology at the New School for Social Research and has received honorary degrees from Loyola University, University of Notre Dame, University of Geneva, University of Munich, Sofia University, and Renmin University of China. After serving in the US Army, Berger taught at several universities, notably Rutgers and Boston College. His published works include the books Modernity, Pluralism and the Crisis of Meaning (with Thomas Luckmann); In Praise of Doubt (with Anton Zijderveld); Religious America, Secular Europe? (with Grace Davie and Effie Fokas); and Questions of Faith, Many Globalizations (edited with Samuel Huntington).

This event is funded by the William Orville Thomson Endowment.

The Athenæaum’s notable collection of tracts and broadsides sheds light on nineteenth century relationships between Christians of European descent and people of other backgrounds. Visit the Athenæum’s Digital Collections online to view Indian speech: delived [sic] before a gentleman missionary, from Massachusetts, by a chief, commonly called by the white people Red Jacket: his Indian name is Sagu-ya-what-hath, which being interpreted, is Keeper-awke [sic]. This broadside of a speech delivered in 1805 by Seneca Chief Red Jacket concerns attempts by white missionaries to convert Native Americans of the Six Nations (Iroquois Confederacy) to Christianity.

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