Skip to content Skip to navigation

Liberty: Proclamation of Emancipation

E.C. Bridgman, Publisher

As the voting rights movement progressed, advocates of the Reconstruction agenda gave political priority to suffrage for formerly enslaved Black men, urging women to wait their turn. This is where we see the divide and conquer tactic take shape in the 15th Amendment. Fissures in the abolitionist movement at the intersection of race and gender created new anti-suffrage arguments centered around miscegenation and other unfounded phobias that severely hindered the woman’s suffrage movement.

This broadside paints an idyllic picture of male suffrage as a pursuit of happiness that will end in freedom, justice, and equality for all. Yet the truth was that throughout the South, Black men were being hunted and lynched to intimidate entire communities from casting their votes, thus preserving the white supremacist political structure of the "Old South" for generations to come.

Liberty: Proclamation of Emancipation