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Panko Votes for Women—the Great Card Game

  • Box
  • PANKO or Votes for Women - Card Verso
    Card Verso
  • Panko Votes for Women—the Great Card Game: Instructions
    Instructions
  • PANKO or Votes for Women - Toot! Toot! Toot!
    Suffragists (10) Toot! Toot! Toot!
  • Suffragists (20) Pank! Pank! Pank!
    Suffragists (20) Pank! Pank! Pank!
  • Suffragists (30) Law! Law! Law!
    Suffragists (30) Law! Law! Law!
  • Suffragists (40) Votes for Women
    Suffragists (40) Votes for Women
  • Anti-Suffragists (10) Help! Help! Help!
    Anti-Suffragists (10) Help! Help! Help!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
    Anti-Suffragists (20) Turn 'em Out!
  • Anti-Suffragists (30) Fourteen Days!
    Anti-Suffragists (30) Fourteen Days!
  • Anti-Suffragists (40) Gaol! Gaol! Gaol!
    Anti-Suffragists (40) Gaol! Gaol! Gaol!
 
Women's Social and Political Union (Great Britain)
Purchase, Katharine Cortesi Armstrong Fund, 2019
 

The Panko Votes For Women card game was propaganda in support of the women’s suffrage movement in Great Britain, consisting of caricatures of Lloyd George, Winston Churchill, and an imprisoned suffragette engaging in a hunger strike. The card game was part of a much larger commercial campaign to publicize the militant women’s suffrage movement in Great Britain. The game was likely named after Emmeline Pankhurst, a British political activist and organizer of the British suffragette movement who helped women win the right to vote.

The British and American suffrage movements happened concurrently but had several distinct differences. Most notable was the relative degree of militancy of the women’s efforts that led to a nuance of vocabulary. In America, advocates for women's right to vote—suffragists—believed in peaceful, constitutional campaign methods. In Great Britain, most in the movement were identified as suffragettes, a derivative of suffragist intended to be derogatory and misogynistically reductive. British suffragists—or suffragettes—were more aggressive and willing to take direct, militant action for the cause.