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Woman Suffrage a Menace to Social Reform

Margaret Louise Casson Robinson, 1864-1932
Gift of Elizabeth Booth, 1936

From the inception of the suffrage movement, there were women among the most ardent anti-suffragists. Kate Gannett Wells argued that women could wield more influence by advocating for moral reform and education than by voting. Margaret C. Robinson was a well known adversary of what she deemed radical propaganda that could transform women into “an undesirable type of citizen.” Traditionalists like Wells and Robinson believed that equality between the sexes would be terminally disruptive to the general order of society. They feared equality would lead to increased crime, gambling, orphaned children, and other societal ills.

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Woman Suffrage a Menace to Social Reform