Skip to content Skip to navigation

Muslims in America since 1619

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Reception to follow
Thomas Jefferson Library Collection (Library of Congress)
Thomas Jefferson Library Collection (Library of Congress).

Muslims in America since 1619

Shareda Hosein

Community Muslim Chaplain and retired US Army Reserves Lieutenant Colonel Shareda Hosein will chronicle the experiences of free and enslaved Muslims who have served in US wars, dating back to the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. Hosein will also explore connections between the Founding Fathers and global Muslims, and the impact of these relationships on US history.

Shareda Hosein serves as a Community Muslim Chaplain in the Greater Boston area and volunteers as the Spiritual Counselor at the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center. She speaks about all things Islam and participates in interfaith programs and dialogues at the local and national levels. Hosein holds a graduate certificate in Islamic chaplaincy and a master’s degree in Islamic studies/Christian-Muslim relations from Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut. She retired as a lieutenant colonel from the US Army Reserves after 35 years of service. She is a founding member and served as the first treasurer of the Association of Muslim Chaplains, has served as the Muslim Chaplain at Tufts University, and was a panelist on the WRKO radio show in Boston Talking Religion. Hosein lives in Quincy, Massachusetts with her husband Jack Keenan.

This is the final program in Rookie Republic: Early America and Its Place on the Global Stage, a three-part series that highlights diverse and lesser-told stories of life, culture, and commerce in the burgeoning American nation. Join us on Wednesday, November, 2, for George Washington’s Library at the Athenæum: Transatlantic Dialogues of Slavery and Freedom and on Wednesday, November 16, for Black Pepper: Taste a Revolutionary Story.

Thomas Jefferson owned a 1764 English translation of the Qur’an entitled The Koran, Commonly Called the Alcoran of Mohammed, which is now held in the collections of the Library of Congress. Schedule an appointment in the Vershbow Special Collections Reading Room to read the 1734 edition of this same translation.

To register, follow the registration button on the right. If you would prefer your information to pre-populate, log in to your My Athenæum Profile. To log in to your My Athenæum Profile click on the profile icon found in the upper right corner of each page on our website.

If you do not yet have a profile, select “New User? Create an account” on the Profile Login page. Members create their own accounts; a username and password are not assigned when you join the Athenæum.